Cilantro

Cilantro
Cilantro

An herb with wide delicate lacy green leaves and a pungent flavor. The seed of the cilantro plant is known as coriander. Although cilantro and coriander come from the same plant, their flavors are very different and cannot be substituted for each other. (Some countries refer to the cilantro as coriander, so any references to “fresh coriander” or “coriander leaves” refer to cilantro.)
All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the most commonly used in cooking. Coriander is commonly used in Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Indian, South Asian, Mexican, Latin American, Chinese, African and Southeast Asian cuisine. Store in refrigerator with cut ends in a jar of water and leaves loosely covered with a plastic bag for several days. Change water every 2 days. Or store in a plastic bag for a week.

Cilantro Lime Rice

cilantro-lime-rice12

INGREDIENTS
  • 2 tablespoons  olive oil
  • 1 small  onion, chopped
  • 1 large jalapeno, seeded and minced
  • 2 cloves  garlic, minced
  • 2 cups  white rice(Japanese best)
  • 1(14 1/2 ounce) can reduced-sodium fat-free chicken broth
  • 1(4 ounce) candiced green chilies (mild)
  • 1⁄2teaspoon  salt
  • 3⁄4cup lightly packed chopped cilantro
 DIRECTIONS
  1. In a large heavy saucepan, heat oil over medium high heat.
  2. Add onion and cook 2 minutes.
  3. Add jalapeno and garlic, cook 2 to 3 minutes, until onion is soft and beginning to color.
  4. Add rice and cook, stirring constantly, until grains turn translucent, 1 to 2 minutes.
  5. Pour in broth and 1 can water and bring to a boil.
  6. Stir in chiles and salt.
  7. Cover, reduce heat to low and cook 15 to 17 minutes, or until liquid is absorbed and rice is tender.
  8. Stir in cilantro just before serving.